TEACHING AND LEARNING THROUGH PROBLEM SOLVING MIKE OLLERTON

There are 9L of apple juice and every 1L is put in a jar. There are 9L of apple juice and every 0. For example, when talking about transformations of shapes, we can use our hands to show reflection from palms up to palms down. I am looking forward to hearing about it. Recently I have been reading and learning about exploratory practice, thanks to a very interesting talk and a few articles.

The article includes an example about the teaching of division involving decimal numbers. However, an experienced mathematics teacher will organise this series of tasks hierarchically and provide scaffolding to illustrate and generalize… mathematical ideas. How many jars are needed? Exploratory practice, on the other hand, is set up by the teacher in a way that students are asked to learn as they go by trying to generalise. First, teaching through movement.

Yet some Western onlookers say that mathematics education in China is characterised by rote throuvh or passive transmission. The article by Lai and Murray quotes international maths comparisons that show that Chinese learners have a very secure understanding of the mathematics they have learned, and that they can apply it.

I wonder if this also extends to use of manipulatives? This exercise might be considered rote drilling if computing for a correct answer is the focus. Trninic linked this kind of exploratory practice to the way people ollegton dance or martial arts. They recount that they were asked to read an article in advance: Recently I have been reading and learning about exploratory practice, thanks to a very interesting talk teacjing a few articles.

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For example, when talking about transformations of shapes, we can use our hands to show reflection from palms up to palms down.

First, teaching through movement. This helped them develop an understanding about proportions. This reminded me of some reading I have been doing about procedural variation. There are 9L of apple juice and every 1L olletron put in a jar. A good question, and one which I have not fully answered yet. She presents problem strings which are sets of questions that lead a learner to see patterns and make generalisations about number.

The solcing includes an example about the teaching of division involving decimal numbers.

teaching and learning through problem solving mike ollerton

Do you use exploratory practice in the classroom and have some resources to share? I have been encouraged by a recent Jo Boaler article to use movement and gestures more. This type of procedural variation involves varying the problem.

There are 9L of apple juice and every 0. He has done some work on proportional reasoning in which students raise their two arms to different heights above the desk while looking at a coloured screen. In the UK, there ollertom recently been a two-year-long teacher exchange with Shanghai.

Mike Ollerton – In Pursuit of Great Mathematics Teaching

There are two other types of procedural variation: There are 9L of apple juice and every 3L is put in a jar. Tweet me mathsfeedback or comment below.

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He wondered if practicing in this way — he called it exploratory practice — would prove valuable.

He mentioned that he wants to work on conditional probability next. However, an experienced mathematics teacher will organise this series of tasks hierarchically and provide scaffolding to illustrate and generalize… mathematical ideas. I am looking forward to wolving about it. Shanghai Maths and Procedural Variation This reminded me of some reading I have been doing about procedural variation.

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In this series of tasks, the total amount of apple juice was kept constant while the amount in a jar was varied from a whole litre to less than a litre. Skip to content Recently I leaening been reading and learning about exploratory practice, thanks to a very interesting talk and a few articles. Exploratory practice, on the other hand, is set up by the teacher probllem a way that students are asked to learn as they go by trying to generalise.

Dragan Trninic was talking about how maths can be learned through bodily movements.

teaching and learning through problem solving mike ollerton

In those disciplines, students learn through a collection of sequenced movements, making improvements as they go.

How many jars are needed?